A Taste For Monsters – Matthew J. Kirby

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-9-27-16-pmThe premise of this well researched, Young Adult historical novel sounds bizarre, but the unique elements of magical realism provide for a very interesting read. Evelyn, a young woman disfigured by factory work, manages to avoid life on the streets when hired to care for England’s infamous Elephant Man in London Hospital. Like Joseph Merrick, Evelyn wants to hide from the world and seeks sanctuary from the dangers lurking outside. Merrick is a gentle soul who does not recoil from her, or she from him. But danger, it seems, exists within the walls of the hospital, too. It’s 1888 and Jack the Ripper is terrorizing the city. When the ghosts of the women the Ripper has killed begin to haunt Merrick and Evelyn, she must go beyond the gates to save the Elephant Man’s life, and to bring closure to the Ripper’s victims. Outside, Evelyn is once again confronted with the hatred directed at anyone different, which hampers her struggle for self acceptance. A timely read which fosters compassion and understanding in the current political climate.

I’m Not Your Manic Pixie Dream Girl – Gretchen McNeil

manic-pixieBea and her best buds, Spencer and Gabe, are at the bottom of the high school food chain, but Bea plans to change all that. An academic whiz kid, she uses her math skills to concoct a popularity formula so the guys will stop being bullied. Soon, Gabe is best friends with the “It” girls, and Spencer’s flair for art is getting him noticed. When Bea’s boyfriend dumps for her a quirky new girl, she decides to use the formula on herself-morphing into a manic pixie dream girl in the best tradition of Audrey Hepburn, Reese Witherspoon and Alicia Silverstone. But being popular brings with it new problems, especially for her friends. Can Bea fix things and reclaim her true identity, or will she succumb to the lure of the popular crowd? Based on a novel idea, this well-written YA book held my interest from beginning to end. Kudos to the author for originality and for making Bea good at math! #weneedmoregirlsinstem

The Muralist – B.A. Shapiro

shapiro_muralist_jkt_hrAlizee is a painter working for Roosevelt’s WPA when she vanishes in 1940. Tormented by her inability to get visas for her Jewish family living in German-occupied France, Alizee’s behavior becomes increasingly erratic. Worried friends, fellow artists Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Lee Krasner, don’t know what to do. Seventy years later, Alizee’s niece, Danielle, uncovers paintings hidden behind the works of these famous Abstract Expressionists which may hold the answer to Alizee’s mysterious disappearance. Switching back and forth between pre-WWII and today, the author captures the inner workings of New York’s art scene and the first truly American school of painting. Through her poignant description of Alizee’s descent into madness, she also manages to highlight the forgotten plight of European refugees who were not granted asylum in the United States. What happened to Alizee and was she the impetus that spurred her fellow painters to greatness? An interesting work of fiction for adults that stays with you long after you’ve finished the book.

Everything Everything – Nicola Yoon

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Maddie is allergic to everything in this complex Young Adult Novel – a bubble girl so sick she can’t leave the sterile environment her mother has created at home. The only other person allowed inside is Carla, the nurse. At seventeen, Maggie has accepted her fate, until a moving van pulls into the driveway next door. From her window, she sees a guy her age dressed all in black. Maddie knows she’s going to find a way to meet him, just as she knows it isn’t going to end well. Soon enough, she’s furtively messaging Olly. Then she convinces Carla to let him in the house. When her mom finds out, she brings the hammer down firing Carla and putting Maddie on restriction. Maddie has to decide if living is worthwhile given her condition, or if she’d rather throw her life away for a brief taste of normal with Olly on the outside. This is an excellent, well-written book, good enough to get a major push from Random House Teens.

Facebook YA Group

I just started a Facebook group for anyone who enjoys Young Adult Lit. It’s a little easier there to talk back and forth. Here’s the address if you’d like to join and discuss your favorite YA books! https://www.facebook.com/groups/329977877357211. Or, just put the name of the group in the search box at the top of the page – Young Adult Book Lovers Speak. Come join us, and happy reading!

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Twisted – Laurie Halse Anderson

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-9-40-48-amHigh school senior Tyler Miller was a nerd until he got busted for graffiti and given outdoor community service. Now 6’3 and built, he attracts the interest of the girl he’s always crushed on, queen bee Bethany Milbury. She’s also the daughter of his father’s boss and the sister of a bully. Tyler is dazzled until Bethany proves less than loyal and their relationship ends. When her nude picture shows up on the internet, Tyler is the obvious suspect because of their fight and his criminal background. The fall out has him questioning his newfound popularity (now on the skids), school in general and the dynamics in his dysfunctional family.  An interesting read by a terrific YA author who writes imperfect yet relatable characters.

Wintergirls – Laurie Halse Anderson

9780142415573I’ve been in a Young Adult phase, but there are so many good books in this genre it’s hard to go back to staid Adult Lit. One of the better authors is Laurie Halse Anderson. She scores with Wintergirls, which is older, but excellent nonetheless. Lia and Cassie are best friends, competing to be thin. Lia is haunted by Cassie after she dies and wracked with guilt for not being there for her at the end. Although she is in “recovery,” Lia begins to backslide. Divorced parents don’t help. High expectations don’t either. Lia’s father is a professor and author; her mother a cardiac surgeon. Each is so busy, neither notices at first when Lia starts restricting food and cutting. This sounds like a depressing book about a subject that’s been well covered. It’s sad, but the writing is so immediate, it’s hard to put the book down. Lia is a real character who leaps off the page; one you root for to conquer her devastating illness.

The Impostor Queen – Sarah Fine

the-imposter-queen-203x300This is a better than average addition to the pantheon of YA fantasy featuring young women with extraordinary ability. Born with the mark of those capable of wielding powerful magic, Elli is chosen by the Elders as the next Queen. Raised in luxury, a prophesy predicts she will be the most powerful ruler yet. But when the current queen dies defending the kingdom from invasion, Elli’s magic fails to manifest. Vilified, she flees, saved from certain death by a handsome outlander who possesses illegal magic of his own. It’s with his secretive people that she begins to question the known world and her role in it. This book captured my interest from page one despite too much unnecessary running around.  I would also have preferred it to stand alone, and not be part of the ubiquitous three-novel trilogy, but it’s still a decent read.  If you enjoyed Throne of Glass by Sarah Maas or Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo, you’ll like this one, too.

 

A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy – Sue Klebold

book-cover-1I still remember the day Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris walked into Columbine High School in Colorado, killed twelve students, a teacher and wounded twenty-four others before committing suicide. It wasn’t the first such shooting, but it was the biggest at the time, ushering in a new era of fear for school aged children. Many of us wondered how such a tragedy could occur. Where were Dylan and Eric’s parents? In this book, Dylan’s mother, Sue, shares her grief and shame, and with unflinching honesty, describes the signs she might have missed. What’s truly alarming about her story, though, is that the Klebolds were a normal middle class family. There may have been subtle signs Dylan was in trouble, but no large red flags.  The Klebolds could be any of us. And, until we remove all impediments to treating people for mental health, the scenario is bound to happen again and again. A frightening, yet fascinating, glimpse inside the life of a mass murderer in the making.